Blog Page

End of Season Points Chaser – Danny’s Despair

railtonj 0 Comments

By Website Editor
For the penultimate time this season, the HTRC Racing Team took to the start line on Sunday 14 September for the 44 mile End of Season Points Chaser at Witham St Hugh’s just outside of Lincoln.

We had a strong squad of 4, which included myself, Danny Posnett, Will Thomas and George Leighton – who was entering his final race of the season and keen to go out with a bang.
Reminiscent of Paris-Roubaix
The course was a virtually pan flat lap of 5.5 miles to be covered 8 times. Although flat, there were a number of narrow sections on the route littered with pot holes. As for the weather, well it was a little overcast but dry and warm with just a small breeze in the air.

After a briefing from the commissaire, and a short neutralised section to the course from the HQ, we were off and the pace was fairly brisk to start with. The first sections weren’t too bad, but once we hit the narrow section we’d been warned about, we immediately saw riders bouncing wide and into the potholes. It was a scene reminiscent of Paris-Roubaix with the road narrowing and riders eager to get to the front and out of trouble. I had a shocker of a start and was too far back. George was also with me at the rear of the bunch, so once we hit the exposed section of narrow road, George was tailed off. I myself was having to work my way around rider after rider to get to within the main pack of riders.
Chased down
Once off the narrow section, the race calmed down, which came as a relief to me at first, but having settled down I noticed no-one was willing to race and attack. That soon changed though when our own Danny Posnett shot out of the bunch and a flurry of riders came after him. Unfortunately, and despite our blocking tactics, the move was nullified and it was status quo for the time being.

I was next to try my hand with a attack on lap 3, but despite bridging to another rider and getting a small break formed, the pack chased us down too and things were as they were.
Create a breakaway
At the end of lap 4 was a prime sprint and upon realising I wasn’t going to win that, I thought I’d try a canny move and bridge up to the riders who’d gone for the sprint, and therefore pulled out a gap, in a bid to try and create a breakaway. So the riders wound it up and duly sprinted for the line. I was in about 15th position and once we crossed the line attacked, bridged to the group of 6 and tried to get something organised. This move was a little more successful and we lasted around half a lap, but no one really wanted to commit and, inevitably, the pack closed us down.
Threshold limit
It was at this point when I started to question the strength of the other riders. No-one seemed capable of working, which meant I had to either go solo or opt to sprint. So, onto the 6th lap I followed a move from an Airedale Olympic rider and we immediately got a gap. After a few turns, the Airedale rider eased up having seen the bunch wasn’t too far behind, but I’ve always been told that you don’t give up until the pack is on your wheel.

So, I duly carried on, and without realising had opened up a gap. I focused on my heart rate and essentially time-trialled my way round at my threshold limit. To my surprise, every time I looked back the gap had grown, so much so that I couldn’t see them on some of the shorter straights. A lot of this was thanks to the help of Will and Danny who did their best to block any moves at the head of the bunch.
No-one else knows how to ride in a group
This was brilliant I thought, but I’d perhaps I’d gone too early to go solo. The exposed section halted my progress a little, but when I was caught, it wasn’t the bunch, but a group of 5 riders instead. I tucked in behind, gathered my breath and started to work. Unfortunately, barring one other rider, no-one came through. It was the most infuriating situation, here we were a break of 6 with a great opportunity to gain points and we’re about to throw it away because no-one else knows how to ride in a group.

They should perhaps do some of Jim’s training and learn for next year! So, the obvious happened and we were swallowed up just before the finish line.
‘In for a penny in for a pound’
That didn’t stop me having another go. I got to the front and attacked staying in the saddle. My legs were not as fresh as the previous lap though so I wasn’t able to gain as much ground. I pulled another rider with me but we were soon caught.

Coming up to the start and finish line for the penultimate time, I concocted a plan. I was to tell Danny that I’d attack again and if unsuccessful he’d counter. Unfortunately when I came past, he was trapped in the bunch on the complete opposite side of the road to me. I thought I’d try it anyway and see what happens – ‘in for a penny in for a pound’ as they say.
Attacked and managed to get a gap
So the bell rung and I moved myself right up to the front in second wheel. I attacked again, got a gap again and was chased, yes surprisingly, again. But I’d drawn the sting out of the other riders legs and Danny, without being told remember, attacked and managed to get a gap with another rider. I had a big grin on my face once the pace at the front of the bunch eased up, thinking the winning move had gone.

But once we hit the windy exposed section Danny was caught, or so I thought. The bunch got to the tail end of the group then the rider in 2nd wheel behind Danny pulled up leaving him free once again. At this point we only had a couple of miles left and Danny’s gap was now widening. Me and Will though perhaps made a mistake without realising. We were so caught up in seeing if Danny could survive, that we’d forgotten our tried and tested blocking tactic. This meant riders at the front had a free rein to pull him back, and the gap was starting to decrease.
Too close to call
It was a nail-biting finish with me thinking ‘yes he’s won’ to ‘no, it’s over’ and then back to ‘yes he’s won’. In truth it was just too close to call once we were onto the finishing straight. Unfortunately luck wasn’t to be on Danny’s side and as the sprint revved up he was caught with what must have been just a 100 metres left before the finish (Tony Martin at the Vuelta last year came to mind).
Heartbroken
He ended up freewheeling with us over the line, clearly shattered from his effort. Once we crossed the line the poor kid parked his bike up and fell to the floor. Other riders thought he’d crashed but he was clearly heartbroken knowing how close he’d come to taking what would have been a most deserved win for Danny and the team. My immediate feeling was one of happiness having ridden so well in places and having felt so strong, but now it’s all sunk in I just feel gutted for Danny and annoyed at myself for not doing more in those closing moments by not blocking the chase behind – we’ll know next time.

Saturday 20th September will cap the end of the 2014 season for the HTRC Racing Team at Selby CC’s road race. Its been an emotional roller-coaster of a ride this year, but today just about topped the lot.

Mark Walker HTRC RR Secretary

Source: Hull Thursday Cycling

    

East Coast Road Race

railtonj 0 Comments

By Website Editor
Sunday 14th September 2014. The finish of the race is a mile-and-a-quarter up from the village of Burton Fleming in the Yorkshire Wolds.

The climb continues towards Hunmanby before descending down South Dale back to Burton Fleming.

The weather was mild and dry with a slight breeze from the north-west.

Here’s Jim Sampson’s account of the progress at the finish line:

A and B Categories

First lap in 20:15, about 18 riders together led by Mark Dicconson (Hull Thursday RC).

Second lap, the prime lap, timed 17:30. First was Mark Woodgate, 2nd Lee Johnson@ 5 seconds, 3rd Gert Gammelin @ 15 secs Around 13 riders in the bunch led by Karl Martin @ 1’30”. Simon Walter a further 2 minutes back.

Third lap in 19:00. 1st Lee Johns, 2nd Tony Greenhalgh at 25 secs and peloton of 13 riders @ 40 sec. Mark Woodgate, who won the prime last lap was at 3′ 30”.

Fourth lap 19: 40. Bunch of 11 led by Mark Dicconson, Richard Douthwaite and Richard Edmunds. Colin Baldwin dropped out because he thought he had a puncture (only thought he had!).

Fifth lap 18′ 15”. Richard Edwards and Lee Johnson reached the line 35 seconds before a bunch of 12 rides led by Mark Dicconson.

Sixth lap 18:30. Richard Edwards and Lee Johnson still away and Paul Musgrave chasing hard. Peloton is at 2:15 led by Mark Dicconson, Gert Gammelin, Andy Wright and Karl Martin.

Seventh and last lap Edwards and Johnson stayed away; lap time 18:40 and bunch at nearly two minutes.

A and B race 52.5 miles (7 laps) in 2:11:38.

Results

Place
No.
Rider
Age
Group
Time

1
28
Richard Edwards
49
B
In 2:11:38

2
18
Lee Johnson
49
B
@ 2 sec

3
10
Lee Johnson
40
A
@ 1′ 52

4
8
Tony Greenhalgh
40
A
@ 1′ 53”

5
25
Martin Coockerill
49
B
s.t.

6
12
Stephen Ellis
49
B
s.t.

7
11
Paul Bell
45
B
s.t.

8
3
Mark Woodgay
43
A
s.t.

9
19
Paul Musgrave
46
B
s.t.

10
6
Paul Hickman
44
A
@ 1′ 55”

11
15
Gert Gammelin
46
B
@ 1′ 56”

12
4
Richard Douthwaite
44
A
s.t.

13
17
Mark Dicconson
48
B
s.t.

14
22
Andy Wright
45
B
@ 2′ 29”

Riders in the East Coast Road Race 2014 crossing the finish line with Thursday’s Neil Dean pictured top-left.

Jim Sampson

Source: Hull Thursday Cycling

    

Beverley: Assault of elderly woman on Goths Lane.

railtonj 0 Comments

An elderly woman suffered facial injuries and was very shaken by the incident which is alleged to have been carried out by a woman in her 20s. Following the assault the suspect was reported to have gone down

Cherry Tree Lane

.

The suspect is described as in her 20s, around 5′ 3” tall of medium build with bleach-blond/ginger hair. She was described as wearing a white/cream fluffy body warmer and blue ripped jeans.

Anyone who witnessed the incident is asked to contact the police on the non-emergency number 101 quoting log 381 16/09/2014 Alternatively call Crimestoppers anonymously on 0800 555 111.

Source: Police

    

Goole: Assault of 33 year-old man on Boothferry Road.

railtonj 0 Comments

Police are investigating an assault which is alleged to have taken place at around 0145hrs on Monday 15 September 2014.

A 33 year-old Howden man suffered serious facial injuries in the assault which is alleged to have been carried out by two men in the street as the victim left the Old George public house on Boothferry Road.

Anyone who witnessed the incident is asked to contact the police on the non-emergency number 101 quoting Crime Reference CJ/2068823/2014. Alternatively call Crimestoppers anonymously on 0800 555 111.

Source: Police

    

Parents & Guardian “dad & lads” Camp September 2014

railtonj 0 Comments

By Arapaho

IMG_5297

Squirrel Wood, Nr Doncaster


WP_20140914_044
WP_20140914_035
WP_20140914_031
WP_20140914_008
WP_20140913_049
WP_20140913_044
WP_20140913_012
SAM_3822
SAM_3815
SAM_3798
IMG_5312
IMG_5315
WP_20140913_022

This is the only camp that parents are allowed to attend. This year Arapaho Cubs helped Squirrel Wood celebrate their 70th birthday that did includ a Birthday Cake.

Squirrel Wood put on a party that included a full day of activities concluding with a talent contest entered by our very own Cubs Jen Jemison & Elliot Wilkinson “Jelliott” & a Disco.

All the parents did a fantastic job. The parents helped set up the camp, The parents helped to cook all the meals & the parents helped all the Cubs with the activities that included a number of bouncy castles, a real people person table football, a Sedgeway driving course as well as the usual archery & shooting.

The post Parents & Guardian “dad & lads” Camp September 2014 appeared first on Hessle Scout Group.

Source: Scouts

    

William’s Farm Kitchen Sportive Autumn Cycle Challenge

railtonj 0 Comments

By Website Editor
The William’s Farm Kitchen sportive around Holderness on Sunday 12th October 2014 is open for entries at the Sports Entry Solutions website.

Enter the William’s Farm Kitchen Autumn Cycle Challenge

The route is relatively flat making for a very fast event with many riders averaging 20mph for the 62 mile route. Far from being a boring route it twist and turns its way around the traffic-free lanes of Holderness taking you to some remote villages via little-used roads.

William’s Farm Kitchen will be providing their home cooked food for the feed station and serving a BBQ meal with complimentary beer from Wold Top Brewery after the event. Several HTRC riders have already entered and it would be nice to see some other club members join us on what will hopefully be another high-quality event

Rest assured that this event will be organised to the same standard as the ‘Big G’ and is organised under British Cycling guidelines and their insurance scheme.

Paul Kilvington Organiser

Source: Hull Thursday Cycling

    

Thousands flocked to Hull’s thriving Fruit Market area this weekend to visit Hull Folk Festival.

railtonj 0 Comments

By sam

Now in its second year, the Festival, funded by Hull City Council, kicked off with a 3-day Festival warm-up during the week at The SESH – with its recent move to The Polar Bear – The New Adelphi Club and King Billy. Friday saw the official ticketed launch, which saw local guitar legend Martin Simpson take to the stage at FRUIT. Martin was supported by folk trio The Young ‘Uns, who captivated audiences with their eclectic folk renditions.
Martin Simpson commented: “In this country the Folk scene is doing better than it ever has. I love Hull, it’s thriving and the audience were great. There is a wonderful ambience to the Hull Folk Fest, it’s a really happening scene.”
The Festival saw over 40 free live acts take the stages situated along the Fruit Market streets. The Ant Farm Collective kicked off the celebrations on the Minerva Main stage on Saturday, which culminated in a lively performance by The Hillbilly Troupe. Sunday saw Crooked Weather, Shiznitz and Grace and the Magic Roots take to the stage among others.
Thieving Harry’s and Green Bricks also hosted free folk sets, from the talented Jody McKenna, Monkeys Fist and Lyn Acton, to D-Day war veteran and singing legend Jim Radford. Hull Folk Festival Shanty Choir, a supergroup made up of the festival musicians, entertained audiences at Green Bricks.
The Minerva, Green Bricks and Thieving Harry’s were packed to the rafters throughout the weekend.
Kevin Godwin, crowd goer commented: “I’ve really enjoyed the festival, Mighty And The Moon and Hillbilly Troupe have been my favourite. Hull has a great base of talent that I don’t think people ordinarily realise. It’s the best area for music.”
In addition to the music, Hull Folk Festival provided a plethora of entertainment to educate people about the history of folk culture, with traditional dancing on the Marina from Rackaback Morris, Raving Maes, Makara Morris, Tatterfoal Morris, Green Ginger Garland and Regency Dancers to the docking of the boats, including the Historic Ship of the year; Daybreak. Daybreak was joined by Sloop Society’s keel Comrade, which was built at New Holland in 1923, the Humber keel Evangeline and Humber sloop Phyllis.
Pimms and real ale were the order of the day for many, with the mini real ale festival returning to the Minerva. The late summer sunshine added the perfect touch to a fantastic line-up of talent and entertainment.
Tom, crowd-goer, said: “The music is great and the festival is well planned out. The food and drink on offer is a definite highlight, as is the community spirit and atmosphere.”
Ciggy, of Leeds, said: “I came to Hull Folk Festival because I love music and it has been great to see the community out in full force supporting the folk music scene. I would come again – it’s been great.”
Hull Folk Festival culminated in a second ticketed gig for New Rope String Band which took place at Jubilee Church in the city. Audiences flocked to see the once seen never forgotten trio on their last ever tour.
Paul and Joy Twogood commented: “The Folk Festival has been very good, it’s about time we had events like this in Hull. We loved seeing Jim Eldon, the Hillbilly Troupe and New Rope String Band. Every time we come there’s always people you don’t know. We’d like to see the Festival expanded, it’s a matter of getting the local people interested.”
It was great news for the local businesses too, with an estimated 5,000 visitors on the Saturday alone and sales increases on an ordinary weekend.
Minerva’s owner Lee Kirman commented: “Hull Folk Festival has been great. We’ve had triple the footfall and double the sales compared to a regular weekend. It’s great to be involved in the event and we’ve had excellent feedback from all of our customers.”
Thieving Harry’s joint owner, Ali Hubbard said: “We’ve had a busy weekend with both the Folk Festival and Heritage weekend taking place in our great city. Footfall and sales are up a third compared to regular weekends. We’re happy to be involved with the event.”
Polly Sowden, Hull Folk Festival organiser, said: “The weekend has helped to boost footfall to many of the surrounding businesses driving increased sales which in turn will help the local economy, which is fantastic in the run-up to the 2017 celebrations. The festival is only in it’s infancy and we are again pleased with the outcome, the vibe was just right and what was offered to customers was a quality event steeped in folk culture. Every single act was paid to perform, so both the musicians and consumers had a very positive experience. We will carry on our quest to opening up the genre of folk to the wider community!”
Photo credit: Darren Rogers, Ocular_art

Source: Hull Folk Festival

    

Historic Ship of the Year to moor in Hull Marina as part of Hull Folk Festival celebrations

railtonj 0 Comments

By sam
Humber keel ‘Daybreak’; the Historic Ship of the Year for 2014 ,will be moored at Hull Marina on Thursday 11 September as part of the Hull Folk Festival launch celebrations.
Normally moored on The Thames, the ship is currently touring Britain, heading up the east coast and visiting the ports on the way. The ship will remain on display for the Folk Festival throughout the weekend.
The ship has been lovingly restored to original condition by Tony and Sally Woodward.

Also on display in the Marina for the Folk Festival will be the Humber keel and Sloop Society’s keel ‘Comrade’, built in 1923 at Warren’s shipyard at New Holland. Humber keel ‘Evangeline’, will also moor, in addition to the ex-upper Humber survey boat ‘Conservancy’, built in 1958, historic yacht ‘Tegan’ from Grimsby and Humber Sloop ‘Phyllis’.
Polly Sowden, Hull Folk Festival organiser commented: “People may think Hull Folk Festival is just about music, but it’s about so much more than that. Our cities unique folk heritage will be celebrated and the maritime traditions that are steeped in history will form part of the festival. Historic boats from the 1920′s, through wartime and beyond are being brought back and will arrive on Thursday 11 Sept.”
The event has been very kindly sponsored by British Waterways Marinas Limited.

Source: Hull Folk Festival